It’s no secret that marijuana has helped countless Americans deal with mental and physical health issues. In the states that have legalized it, there has been an impressive increase in taxable revenue. Among these is a group of nuns who started with only 12 plants and now have an empire that makes over $1.1 million a year selling cannabis oil.

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In 2011, Sister Meeusen created Sisters of the Valley, a group of nuns that started locally in California before becoming an international operation. They started growing marijuana to help “cure” drug addicts. Don’t worry, if you’re thinking this would be a great premise for a film, you’re not the only one.

In honor of 4/20, a weed user’s favorite holiday, director Rob Ryan is releasing a documentary called “Breaking Habits.” The film follows Meeusen and her team of nuns as they traverse the murky waters of the marijuana business.

The local sheriff in the film is against marijuana and wants to do anything in his power to destroy it, which is something Meeusen refers to as “white man rule.”

“We don’t like the white man rule,” she said. “Farm people are very slow to adapt to new ideas, people are stuck in the 1950s with their ideas towards the cannabis plant for medicinal use.”

The nuns didn’t start this with the idea of making money. Instead, Sister Meeusen and her team looked to cure those who are addicted to alcohol, meth or tobacco with their CBD oils.

“We have a 100 percent success rate in curing people of their addictions,” Meeusen explained. “Admittedly we don’t have a huge sample size, we worked with eight people who were addicted to either alcohol, tobacco or meth, but they all got better.”

The nuns continue to push their CBD oils, which has been used to treat and minimize seizures and certain forms of cancer, in the hope that it will soon be accepted as medicine and not the taboo substance it once was.

“It’s a wonderfully healing plant, gradually the world is starting to open up to the idea of cannabis as medicine, rather than treating it as a dangerous drug,” Meeusen, who is Merced County residence.

Meeusen stated she wasn’t a huge fan of the film, but it’s just the first step into building their empire. “I’ve seen the film so many times I’m sick of it, I didn’t like it but everyone else likes it so I’m happy about that,” Meeusen said.

When asked about the future, Meeusen said: “We’re going to be doing more and more with Hollywood, because that’s the megaphone to the world. We’re also planning an edgy, political series, done in cartoon form.”

Check out the trailer of the documentary below.

Source: The Tribunist

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